The Preservation of the Republic Act of 2011

H.R. [    ], a bill to preserve the Republic

Section 1.  Title.  This act shall be entitled, “The Preservation of the Republic Act of 2011.”

 

Section 2.  Findings.  Congress finds that (1) a patriot saves his country from his government; (2) the Founding Fathers correctly believed that the greatest danger to the Republic was an unaudited, adventurous military shielded from popular accountability; (3)  Article I, section 8, clause 12 of the Constitution was enshrined to prevent military expenditures that were not regularly checked by Congress at intervals of no less than two years in order to prevent the military from escaping popular accountability; (4) unaudited spending by the military enables the President to commence and continue wars without specific war appropriations from Congress, thus crippling the power of the purse as an invincible check on a rogue President or military; (5) the Department of Defense has been expending money in violation of the Constitution for decades because its books are not audited to insure each expenditure can be tied to a congressional appropriation within the two-year constitutional window; (6) unaudited spending by the Department of Defense has occasioned staggering waste and abuse that would to intolerable in any other executive branch agency; and, (7) unaudited military spending threatens the solvency of the nation and the liberties of its people by encouraging perpetual warfare.

Section 3.  Joint Congressional Defense Department Audit Committee.  There is hereby created a Joint Congressional Defense Department Audit Committee to consist of twelve (12) members:  six Members of the House of Representatives and six Members of the Senate appointed by the Speaker of the House and the Majority Leader of the Senate, respectively.  The Joint Committee shall have responsibility for auditing the books of the Department of Defense annually.  It shall have power to issue subpoenas and to appoint certified public accountants, and other staff.  Beginning in fiscal year 2014, no appropriations bill for the Department of Defense may be voted on by the House of Representatives or Senate unless the Joint Congressional Defense Department Audit Committee by majority vote has certified to the Speaker of the House and the Majority Leader of the Senate that the Defense Department’s spending for the previous fiscal year been satisfactorily audited according to customary accounting standards

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